NGSLT

 
   

 

Lexicography, lexicology, and corpus analysis

November 26–30, 2007

 

Lecturer

Prof. Patrick Hanks (Masaryk University, Czech Republic)

Venue

Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science (University of Latvia)
Raiņa blvd. 29, Riga, Latvia

Purpose

The aim of this course is to improve understanding of the usefulness of corpus data in empirical language research and in particular to explore the following relationships:

- between word meaning and word use;
- between literal and metaphorical meaning;
- between conventional and creative use of language.

Contents

 

Theme

Date

Time

Room

1

Onomasiological and semasiological lexicography: past, present, and future.
Technology, lexicography, and the dissemination of ideas in the European Renaissance.
Where Wilkins and Leibniz got it wrong.

Mo, Nov 26

12:30–14:00
14:30–16:00

413

2

Linguistic Norms and Pragmatic Exploitations: how language really works.
Prototype theory and natural language.

Tu, Nov 27

12:30–14:00
14:30–16:00

104

3

Corpus Pattern Analysis: how to map meaning onto use.
Hands-on session.

We, Nov 28

10:30–12:00
12:30–18:00

104
404

4

Ontologies, semantic types, and lexical sets.

Th, Nov 29

12:30–14:00

413

5

Natural language processing and the semantic web.

Th, Nov 29

14:30–16:00

413

6

Literal meaning, metaphors, and similes.

Fr, Nov 30

12:30–14:00

413

7

Closing seminar.

Fr, Nov 30

14:30–16:00

413

Slides

Intro, Monday, Tuesday (1), Tuesday (2), Wednesday, Course work, Thursday (1), Thursday (2), Friday, Summary

Requirements

In the hands-on session students will undertake a corpus-based lexical analysis, with brief commentary (in not more than three pages), of at least two polysemous words in English. Choose a word such as "spoil", which is already in FrameNet. Consider the following questions:

- How can we tell one meaning of a word from another?
- How does word meaning relate to word use?
- Does FrameNet cover all senses of the word you have chosen?
- If not, what senses are missing, and what frame do you suggest for them?

In the closing seminar students will be asked to make a 5–7 minute presentation of their findings.

A computer room and wireless internet will be available.

ECTS credits

4

Prerequisites

A belief that linguistics should study words and meanings empirically.
General knowledge of lexical semantics (e.g. in D. A. Cruse).
Familiarity with FrameNet.

Reading list

Nearly one hundred papers, articles, and extracts covering every aspect of lexicology can be found in a six-volume collection: P. Hanks (Ed.). Lexicology: Critical Concepts in Linguistics. Routledge, 2007. Course participants before the course should read:

- General Introduction by P. Hanks
- Selections from L. Wittgenstein, edited by Y. Wilks
- "Beginning the study of Lexis" by J. M. Sinclair
- At least one paper by A. Wierzbicka
- At least one paper by I. Mel'čuk
- "The Generative Lexicon" by J. Pustejovsky
- Other papers, according to taste

Almost all papers can be found elsewhere as well. Browse the table of contents for more precise references.
Pre-publication versions of the first two items will be distributed on a request (contact information is given below).

Course application form

http://www.ngslt.org/application/courseapplication.html

Local contact persons

Normunds Grūzītis

Gunta Nešpore